Q. What are the State's 8 Priority Areas for LCFF?

A.  The State Board of Education selected the following eight areas as those toward which LCFF funding should be directed:

* Student Achievement: measuring success through test scores, English proficiency, and college preparedness, which are all important to continue California's recent improvements: nearly 8 out of 10 students (78.5%) who started high school in 2008-09 graduated with their class in 2012 (Learn more about achievement rates)

* Implementation of Common Core state standards: transitioning to the new academic standards (Learn more about Common Core)

* Course Access: ensuring all students have access to classes that prepare them for college and career, regardless of what school they attend or where they live (Learn about the courses required for admission to University of California campuses and see how many California students have completed these requirements)

Basic Services: guaranteeing well-maintained school facilities and up-to-date materials (Learn about how schools that are safe and in good repair improve learning)

* Student Engagement: focusing on steps schools can take to help kids feel more enthusiastic about learning so they miss fewer days and become more likely to graduate (Learn more about student engagement)

* School Climate: promoting a calm, positive and productive school environment, including reducing suspension rates and misbehavior (Learn more about school climate)

* Parent Involvement: participating in school district decision-making and the progress being made by their children (Learn more about parent involvement)

* Other Student Outcomes: physical education, the arts, and other areas of study

Each Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP) and budget must demonstrate how funds will be used to address each of these areas and improve outcomes for all students as well as for specific student subgroups.

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commented 2014-09-14 06:47:15 -0700 · Flag
A teen neighbor of mine participated in the career and criminal justice academy his first year at Hiram Johnson High School in Sacramento. He was excited to get into the program because he wants to by a community police officer. When he went to sign up for criminal justice for his sophomore year, he was told by his counselor he could not because they couldn’t provide a TA. So he they put him in sign-language. How is this course access? Is the trend towards career tech only for a select group of students?